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Thirsty Thursday 3

April 10, 2012

I hope you all had a chance to see the cute little teapot from Tuesday.  Since it seemed small, personal and calming, I thought calming teas were in order for today!

Have you ever heard the quote by William Gladstone – “If you are cold, tea will warm you. If you are heated, it will cool you. If you are depressed, it will cheer you. If you are excited, it will calm you.”  Well this sums it up!  Everyone might have a different tea or herbal that does this to so explore as your hearts content!

As I had mentioned, for this teapot this week, I think I will try some fruity green teas as for some reason with the green poster and the catchy phrase makes me think of goji pom blue green tea, so I brewed that first.  Its a green tea base with superfruits so it is really nice, my traditional green tea with a slightly fruity ending.  It would make a great iced tea when summer comes as well.  Ahhh, it does calm me.

Also a traditionally calming tea is chamomile, which is great before bed as it has no caffeine.  Chamomile has a slightly anise or liquorice taste so if you aren’t a huge fan of that why not try our decaf green mint chamomile, which is equally calming and also has the addition of mint which is calming to the digestive system.  Another super decaf that my super friend, Lisa is so fond of is decaf lemon lime, if you are super sensitive to caffeine but still want the antioxidant properties of green tea, either of these decaf teas would be great to try.  Also some great classic moroccan mint teas and then our own double mint tea are nice calming minty teas.  And for a super after dinner treat, why not try our own special blend called French moroccan mint chocolate tea.

Also how about any of the herbal tisanes, we are just awaiting our final arrival of our new spring and summer teas, many of which are great for iced teas, these will be added to the site shortly.

There are so many other teas that might calm you, its personal remember, what calms you might not calm someone else.  Calmness is a state of mind, memories, peace and tranquility are triggered by different things for different people so please don’t limit yourself to this list, check out all of the great teas at www.teaandallitssplendour.com.

See you soon and as the teapot says…keep calm and drink tea!

Raelene

Teapot Tuesday 3

April 3, 2012

Let me just start with…this is not my usual teapot selection.  Not only was this NOT purchased by my mother, it was a total whim but…I have to admit it made me smile.  It is pretty difficult to actually find tea related graphics on things, its usually coffee (yuck) related so when I saw these two exact phrases in the last two weeks, I had to put them together and share!

The little, and I mean 2 cup max teapot, more like a “tea for one teapot”, I found at Homesense!  It was really inexpensive I think it was $4.  I am sure you have heard of the “Keep calm and carry on” series of products?  Well this apparently is just one more spin off of a great branding idea.  Why not?  Keep calm and well…do anything that keeps you calm after all!  And certainly to all of us die hard tea drinkers out there, tea will fit the bill, do the trick…and well help us to carry on.

The cute little poster I found in MY green no less, at Majesteas on Queen St East in Toronto.  Rob and Ian are great purveyors who are also certified tea sommeliers and have a fun royal themed shop in Leslieville.  (I was down there at a cheese, tea and wine pairing that was quite fun!)

Here is the actual teapot on its own…perspective isn’t great here but as I mentioned it is a one or two cup teapot size.

This teapot is make of ceramic, its not fancy, it is the more whimsical of my collection.  Most of them have some “antique” quality or otherwise uniqueness to them, which I trust you will see in the upcoming weeks and months!

For this teapot this week, I think I will try some fruity green teas as for some reason with the green poster and the catchy phrase makes me think of Goji Pom Blue Green tea, so that will be one of the first ones listed on Thirsty Thursday…see you soon and as the teapot says…keep calm and drink tea!

Raelene

Thirsty Thursday 2

March 29, 2012

                     

After all that talk about the dripless teapot, I couldn’t to actually brew up a pot and show you how truly dripless it is.  Now this is not a video (will have to work on that in a future post!) but it truly is dripless, I even tried but to no avail, it did not drip. For this pottery teapot I decided to brew up a cinnamon roll ceylon tea which had a nice cinnamony flavour on a cool morning.  I don’t use milk in this one but I know my friend does, with a little sugar as well.  Cinnamon is great to control your blood sugar as well, check this out on the web, you will find lots of posts about this.  I also use this one in cooking and baking especially in cookies.

There are many black teas that you could choose from to use this teapot, a great fruity tea, like bahama mama or creamsicle or a wonderfully floral and relaxing lavender earl grey. There are a few other wonderful earl grey teas such as grand earl grey and our very popular creme earl grey.  Some of the classic blends, like organic assam TGFOP, kenilworth OP ceylon, or our kenya FOP are also key features in our signature breakfast blend taais – t breakfast.  Don’t forget our namesake Irish breakfast blend called Gannon Irish breakfast with puerh and a hint of sweetness, without adding more sugar.

When brewing black tea, remember to use a full rolling boil of 212F or 100C, use the best filtered water, and brew for 4 – 5 minutes for a full flavoured black tea, resist the urge to shorten this time if you are used to traditional tea bags.

For a listing of all of our black teas go to our site at www.teaandallitssplendour.com and see what other types of tea you might enjoy!

Adding milk to your black tea, like the chai I mentioned in the last post, helps coat your mouth and tongue so that the tannins aren’t as prominent and it helps smooth the flavour of the strong black tea. Homogenized milk is preferable because if the fat content of the milk is too low, ie 1% or 2% it won’t do the trick quite as well. I also prefer a little honey in my black tea, but again that is a taste preference, sweeten it as you please.  For a detailed look at tea and brewing times check out our all about tea page.

So, gather your tea, your teapot, your cup and sit, relax and enjoy the ritual of tea time…

Thanks,
Raelene

Teapot Tuesday 2

March 27, 2012

So here is the next installment in Teapot Tuesday, I hope you enjoyed the first one!  This teapot made me giggle as I pulled it out of its paper storage wrapping.  The endless search for a dripless teapot.  I think I have heard more comments on “why do teapots drip” that I have on any other topic on teapots.  My favourite retort though is perhaps a little cheeky but likely one of the truer reasons!  Could it possibly be that it is the pourer and not the teapot?  I think patience is more the virtue here!  If we just pour slower, I bet the amount of leakage from the teapot will be very minimal.  You just need to slow down and pour slower, try it and let me know what you think.  Now I also know there are teapots out there that just have NO chance of not dripping, those I have no sympathy for, they are clearly there for their beauty or annoyance or both…so beware and slow down…and not only smell the roses, smell the aroma of the fine tea liquor that is pouring in a thin smooth stream from your teapot!

dripless teapot england

This teapot was a find by my mother, she calls them “gsf” finds, which translates to garage sale find! Its unique spout was intriguing enough but the marketing on the bottom also peaked her interest!

However, I cannot find out the origin of this teapot, can anyone help?  If you can see the picture and tell its origin it would be interesting and add more to the story!

The best part of this teapot though is the dripless concept.  See the picture showing how the liquid actually comes out the bottom of the spout, not at the top as traditional ones do.

Once again this is a typical pottery English teapot so it would have been used with mainly black teas and then drunk with milk and sugar.  So to follow up on the teas that would be served in this teapot I will explore black traditional breakfast and other black teas on the blog on Thursday called Thirsty Thursdays!

Again please do let me know if you know the heritage of this dripless teapot that I love so much!  How great to finally have a dripless teapot in the cupboard!

I hope you enjoy this journey, I have a lot of teapots and tea so I don’t think I will run out anytime soon.

Raelene

Thirsty Thursday

March 22, 2012

After all that talk about teapots and great tea, I could hardly wait to write about tea and of course drink tea, which I have all ready beside me, brewed up to the perfect brew. Today I will marry the Indian and English cultures and make a black chai tea in my Val D’or Royal Albert bone china. This is one of the few teas I actually like a little milk and honey in, it reminds me of fuzzy slippers and plodding around the house in the morning on a day when I don’t have to rush. The word chai in India really just means tea and there are likely as many chai recipes as there are households in India, and that’s a lot! I love the chai wallahs pouring their delicious concoction for passers-by on the side of the road.

When brewing your chai, remember to use a full rolling boil of 212F or 100C, use the best filtered water, and brew for 4 – 5 minutes for a full flavoured chai.

Although there are many different chais, I prefer mine, spicy, gingery and full of cardamom. Like our Abha Chai or Bengal Chai. Also a nice after dinner chai is our Chocolate Chai, which is a less spicy but smooth chai that is a nice way to end a meal. If you prefer a milder chai, still spicy but with a smoother finish, we have Taj Mahal Chai and Masala Chai. If you want a really different and very spicy green chai, try our Kashmiri Green Chai, almondy and cinnamony! For the caffeine free fan, try our Rooibos Chai, caffeine free but will the usual spiciness of chai. Here is a link to the site where the chais are listed with the ingredients.

http://www.teaandallitssplendour.com/store/product-list.php?chai_tea-pg1-cid53.html

Adding milk to your chai, helps coat your mouth and tongue so that the tannins aren’t as prominent and it helps smooth the flavour of the strong black tea. Homogenized milk is preferable because if the fat content of the milk is too low, ie 1% or 2% it won’t do the trick quite as well. I also prefer a little honey in my chai, but again that is a taste preference, sweeten it as you please.

So, gather your tea, your teapot, your cup and sit, relax and enjoy the ritual of tea time…

Thanks,
Raelene

Teapot Tuesday

March 20, 2012

Hi to all and thanks so much for stopping by. This is my new venture to talk teapots with you. I have over 100 teapots and as they are so interesting and diverse, I thought I would take the opportunity to showcase them.

The first one I would like to talk about is my special occasion Val D’or Royal Albert bone china teapot. I have been collecting this version of china since I was about 16. My mother started me on this collection, as when I turned 16, I absolutely HAD to have a china pattern picked out and a collection started…bless her for insisting on this! Maybe this was just the start of my teapot collection, although it wasn’t the first piece of Val D’or that I/she started me with. I love the simplicity of the fine milky translucent bone china and when held up to the light you can see through it.

Around the end of the 18th century, an Englishman named Josiah Spode developed a new formula for china that incorporated the use of calcined bone ash. This is how bone china is still made today, mainly in the UK and preferably with ox bone, if you please! One of the greatest things about this type of material is that bone china actually keeps the tea hot in the cup and the heat away from your lips! Try it, you will see what I mean. As for the age-old adage that you must pour your milk in first to the cup (for black tea of course), one thought on this is that nannies and governesses did this so that they would not break the fine bone china cup when pouring the hot tea into the delicate cup. Sounds valid, anyway you like it, as long as you enjoy your tea.

To follow-up on this new post on Teapot Tuesdays, will be Thirsty Thursdays and I will talk about some of the types of tea that would be used in the teapot that was featured on Tuesday! Hope you enjoy this journey, I have a lot of teapots and tea so I don’t think I will run out anytime soon.

Raelene

Thanks for your patience with the website update!

November 4, 2011

Thanks to all for your patience, I have to admit it wasn’t down for long thanks to the new hosts! A2Hosting! I look forward to putting up the new accessories and teas, have a look and see what’s new.

Raelene

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